The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects Americans against unreasonable searches and seizures, without probable cause and without a Warrant. The Fourteenth Amendment, which states that "No state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States...." applies these protections in the states.

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April 20, 2016

On July 1, 2016, a law that establishes a procedure for the release of law enforcement recordings, i.e., footage from body-worn or dashboard cameras, will go into effect in the state of Indiana. State lawmakers heavily amended the bill, HEA 1019, before it was passed into law on March 21. The amendments helped to rectify some of the problematic parts of the legislation, but those revisions did not go far enough in protecting the legal rights of people under open records laws to access video footage captured on police cameras.

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Race weekend in Indianapolis is full of special traditions for the hundreds of thousands of spectators who gather in Speedway, Ind. It also is a lucrative weekend for taxi drivers, who shuttle people to and from the crowded Speedway track. However, in May 2013, as many as 80 cab drivers had their licenses seized on race day, according to the Speedway Police Department

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During the 1990s police agencies became more aggressive in fighting the war on drugs, which often resulted in threats to individual liberties. In 1998, the Indianapolis Police Department began conducting traffic roadblocks to search for illegal drugs. The city set up checkpoints in neighborhoods with high crime statistics and used dogs to sniff out which cars they would stop to search for drugs. By the time the Indiana Civil Liberties Union (ICLU) won an appeal of a case in federal court on behalf of two men who were searched at a checkpoint, police had stopped 1,161 vehicles and arrested 104 people.

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One spring evening in 1996, David Smith, a sergeant with the Indiana State Police Department, was traveling home to his Carmel subdivision in an unmarked maroon Chevrolet Caprice. While waiting at a traffic light, he saw a Carmel police officer observing him from another lane. Moments later, the officer activated his emergency lights and motioned Smith to pull over.

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